Jul 26 • 8M

Demystification

settling hype in a tone you can carry

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A break from bad news for bites of other pleasures.
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Late Summer in Lofoten, Rachel Marie Wolfe Ammann

In our Internet times, quotes are traded like links as proof, currency designed to convince or to inspire you! Some toss the baby out with the bathwater when it comes to the abundant resource technicians have been building the internet with, claiming the space as purely distraction, or worse, confusion collider.

There are several, seemingly endless scrolls of orders to ensure you are smarter, better, more interesting. Yet quite often we find our most profound insights or understandings of the world by listening or being fully present. This grand central publishing zone appears as a mirror to the celestial psychic tugs humans are levying on each other. And whatever consciousness is, we know mind isn’t something we simply own, but something that we are responsible to sieve through. What’s dust, what’s gold, and what context do different materials have value?

The origins of consciousness have also to deal with awareness. How many times have you walked down a street and noticed something new, that was probably always there. The act of noticing has a fun relationship to how willing you are to be open to perception. And if we go into the unconscious, or what we are not aware of, then surprises tend to happen over and over. The idea those unpleasant experiences point often to the aspects of ourselves we have denied or not yet made peace with is a convenient way to lump our beings into a cosmic stew.

Mind you, I have not and do not plan to ever do mushrooms as I already find the substances that sustain life trippy enough. So whether or not we agree, and we certainly don’t have to, to share this place we call home, what I want to get at here is whether or not such claims are true. And if it is true, how and where is the fiber in your being that tells you with certainty?

So let’s use a popular quote as an example: “Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.” ~ Carl Jung

Useful one Mr. Jung. While Jung`s contributions and insights thankfully countered some of Freud`s fixations, in that he opened up ones ability to distiquish for themselves, the domain of their mind. In a festive argument I’ve shared several times with friends, is the ethics of changing someone’s mind. In that I came through and still work with communications and marketing, as well as having taught yoga, meditation, dance and some arts, I’m deeply sensitive to the ethos of mind. Someone’s Locus of Control, or their ability to attribute their life to being a result of their choices instead of an external entities influence, is a chief concern of mine because we are social creatures. Influence is not always “bad” in that it is not always unhealthy, but discerning what is what, in the beauty of multicultural environment requires a thick bandwidth of compassion, respect, but also tensegrity of individual values.

And I love that word a lot: tensegrity…something that holds up with the laws of physics yet looks effortless because it’s working in concert with nature.

When we look at nature, there are storms, so is it not expected there would be conflicts within the human organisms? And so I find it takes a great deal of time to sort out intrinsic motivation and this strange feature of attempting to tell others what to do. Then again, I am making these assertions from the assumption people are with science…meaning there is a conscience, an ability to doubt and question what is known.

So while social media seems like a space for the quick construction of fuzzy, feel-good aura around smart things dead guys have said, it’s within our own hands to see to what we make use of these spaces for. Lies do not become truths once repeated over and over; that’s one of the sandpaper rubs I had with matras. They are useful, but it is important to learn what one is actually doing. Because what is going into your body, your entire nervous system is a concert of senses. This is one of the reasons I appreciate the cabin life of Norway so much. And as much as I often thought an expert practitioner of consciousness could withstand NYC’s busiest intersections with the same contact with zen, that’s a construct formed for judgement. When every body has their differences in ranges of tolerances.

Which has me wonder, what kinds of behaviors are tolerated is a distinctily cultural phenomena, and high levels of intolerance is by the Wiki definition of sanity…not sane. Narrowness and rigidity is considered a fore-bringer of illness.

Mens sana in corpore sano.

Misty Way to Lofoten, Rachel Marie Wolfe Ammann

Therefore the sounds are what matter here a great deal. Which resonances produce conditions that aid life in growing, and which resonances aid in molding or rotting or what have you? All of these resonances have purposes. So to make tactile what the unconscious and conscious is about when it comes to stepping out of victim positions (which can happen to any of us at any time because we never actually control life) and into assertive stances, it could be said this:

“When past traumas lie buried within, then they will excavate themselves in every life situation. When traumas past are transformed into fertilizer, you become the primary creative force in your life.“ 

Working with these pointers, recalling a time you felt hurt, injured, either physically or emotionally, you can locate the intense feeling and work with it instead of abject it outside of yourself. Even insults are not longer injury but tools. You probably also know fertilizer has a strong smell, and organic or synthesized fertilizers have different smells from each other. And while their products may appear the same, we can know from testing there are differences. These differences are material matters, much as aspects of consciousness ties our immaterial beings to the material beings we are and exist with.

These unconsciousness things are often brought into your direct experience in glaring ways which cannot be avoided. Pain and challenges, are often fertile opportunities for sieving what is important to you, and therefore materialising what matters for you.

I hope next time people go around shouting at people about being woke or wake up, they remember how jarring it is be in a glass jar, and how whole it is to be fully bodied asleep or awake. The possibility for accessing whole consciousness is always there. And it doesn’t cost anything but your full being.

Moon Landing in Lofoten, Rachel Marie Wolfe Ammann